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20121202
20121210
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disturbed by reports that assad may have weapononized some of his stores of chemical and biological agents and prepared them for use in aerial bombs. these reports suggests that assad's forces are waiting for orders. if true, these reports may mean that the united states and our allies are facing the prospect of use of weapons of mass destruction in syria and this may be the last warning we get. time for talking about what to do may now be coming to a close and we may be left with an awful and very difficult decision. whether to continue on the said lines and hope that a man who has slaughtered nearly 40,000 men, women and children in syria will decide not to take the next step and use far more destructive weapons to kill significantly larger numbers of people, whether to take military action of some kind that could prevent a mass atrocity. if that is the choice we now face, it is a grave and sobering decision and would put the starkest expression on the failure of the administration's policy towards syria. savage and unfair fight, this raged now for nearly two years. the longer this confl
a crossroads. turning a corner might be going a bit far. president assad still has substantial military capabilities, quite a bit of support. he still has control of the capital. it is a little bit hard to say. clearly the risk and an upswing on the rebel side. -- there has been an upswing on the rebel side. i think there is momentum in favor of the rebels, but this still seems to be a conflict that can go on for a long time. host: if the regime fails, it president assad is forced out, who takes his place? caller: i think that is a major concern on all fronts. there is a great fear there could be anarchy and chaos. people in syria are well aware of what happened in neighboring iraq. there is a large number of people who are not necessarily tied to the government but are extremely frightened that there could be a bloodletting that was seen in neighboring iraq. host: your in beirut. you are obviously not allowed to travel easily in and out of syria. does a sense of what it is like in that country. -- give us a sense of what it is like in that country. caller: different places have a diffe
president assad that there would be consequences if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people. this marks 20 years since russia and the u.s. agreed to secure weapons in the former soviet state. leon panetta introduces the president at this event. >> thank you. [applause] midafternoon. senators, distinguished guests, ambassadors and officials, thank you all for being here today. i am honored to be able to participate in this symposium marking the 20th anniversary. let me thank the university for their great work in organizing today's conference. it has been a day to reflect on the successes that have been achieved in non-proliferation over the past two decades through the program, and it has been a particular honor to be when the company of senators whose leadership has made this possible. we can stay the course of history change for the better because these men helped the nation confronts the threat of nuclear proliferation at the end of the cold war. the world would have been a far more dangerous and threatening place were it not for these patriots. earlier this afternoon i w
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